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ARTS WRITERS AWARDS

Arts Writers Grant Program Announces 2011 Grants

www.artswriters.org

The Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2011 grant cycle. Designed to encourage and reward writing about contemporary art that is rigorous, passionate, eloquent and precise, as well as to create a broader audience for arts writing, the program aims to strengthen the field as a whole and to ensure that critical writing remains a valued mode of engaging the visual arts. In its 2011 cycle, the Arts Writers Grant Program has awarded a total of $565,000 to twenty-three writers representing twenty projects. Ranging from $8,000 to $50,000 in four categories—articles, blogs, books, and short-form writing—these grants support projects addressing both general and specialized art audiences, from scholarly studies to self-published blogs.

Articles
Alexander Dumbadze, Jack Goldstein and the Origins of Postmodernism (Brooklyn)
Jeff Huebner, William Walker’s Mural Art (Chicago)
Emily Eliza Scott, Toxic Gardens: Patricia Johanson’s House and Garden Proposals (Zurich)
George Stolz, From the Word “Art”: Sol LeWitt’s Use of Language (Madrid)

Blogs
Carol Diehl, Art Vent (Housatonic, MA)
Jason Farago, Art in Common (New York)
Claudia La Rocco, The Performance Club (Brooklyn)
Sohrab Mohebbi, Presence Documents (Brooklyn)
Valerie Soe, beyondasiaphilia (San Francisco)
Meredith Tromble, Art and Shadows (Oakland, CA)
Jason Urban, R.L. Tillman, and Amze Emmons, Printeresting (Austin, TX)

Books
Jane McFadden, There and Not There: Walter de Maria (Los Angeles)
Christine Mehring and Sean Keller, Munich ’72: Olympian Art and Architecture (Chicago)
Judith Ostrowitz, Contemporary Native American Art: Cosmopolitanism and Creative Practice (New York)
Mark Owens, Graphics Incognito: Design, Material Culture, and Post-punk Aesthetics (Philadelphia)
Margarita Tupitsyn, Moscow Vanguard Art Between World War II and the Fall of the Soviet Union (New York)
William Wilson, Ray Johnson: An Illustrated Life in Art (New York)

Short-Form Writing
Kirsty Bell, Berlin
Cinqué Hicks, Atlanta
Murtaza Vali, Brooklyn

Art Writing Workshop
The Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program is pleased to continue its partnership with the International Art Critics Association/USA Section, to give practicing writers the opportunity to strengthen their work through one-on-one consultations with leading art critics. For a list of 2011 Art Writing Workshop recipients, see http://www.artswriters.org/writing_workshop.html.

Turbulence Spotlight: “Aleph Null” by Jim Andrews

Turbulence Spotlight: “Aleph Null” by Jim Andrews
http://turbulence.org/spotlight/alephnull/index.htm

“Aleph Null” is a generative, interactive, open source work written in JavaScript using the HTML5 canvas tag. No plugin required. “Aleph Null” is color music. No audio. It takes practice to tease the really good stuff out of it. It’s like an instrument that way. Or a game in which the goal is to experience color music and create visuals you like. It’s like hunting the Snark, beauty or butterflies. Unlike most instruments, “Aleph Null” will play something whether a person is playing or not. But it benefits immensely by a human player. It knoweth not beauty, is but the instrument of thine own incandesence.

BIOGRAPHY

Jim Andrews has been publishing vispo.com since 1996. It is the center of his work as a writer, poet, programmer, visual artist, audio artist, and net artist.

For more Turbulence Spotlights, visit http://turbulence.org/spotlight

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Please support the Turbulence Commissions Program. See http://turbulence.org for details.

Jo-Anne Green
Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.
New York: 917.548.7780 Boston: 617.522.3856
http://new-radio.org
http://turbulence.org
http://somewhere.org
http://networkedbook.org
http://turbulence.org/blog
http://turbulence.org/networked_music_review
http://turbulence.org/upgrade_boston

Jobs at S1 Artspace

Jobs at S1 Artspace

> Communications Coordinator
3 days pw | £18K pro rata

> Technican
3 days pw | £18K pro rata

> Studios Coordinator
2 days pw | £18K pro rata

Deadline: Mon 26 Sep
Interviews: Thu 29 / Fri 30 Sep

Full details below

S1 Artspace has three new positions currently available, please see
below for full details.

Continue reading »

Introducing ImagePlot Software: explore patterns in large image collections

Image: 883 Manga series from the scanlation site OneManga.com.
Total number of pages: 1,074,790

Lev Manovich and Jeremy Douglass, 2010.

——

ImagePlot is a free software tool that visualizes collections of images and video of any size. (The largest set we tried so was: 1,074,790 one megabyte images).

DOWNLOAD IMAGEPLOT 0.9

ImagePlot works on Mac, Windows, and Lunix.
Max visualization resolution: 2.5 GB (2,684,354,560 grayscale pixels, or 671,088,640 RGB pixels).

ImagePlot was developed by the Software Studies Initiative (softwarestudies.com) with support from the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH), the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), and the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts (CRCA).

Along with the program, we also distribute a number of articles by Lev Manovich, Jeremy Douglass and Tara Zepel that address methodologies for exploring large visual cultural data sets, and discuss our digital humanities projects which use ImagePlot. (The articles can be also downloaded directly from softwarestudies.com.)

Visualizations created with ImagePlot have been shown in science centers, art and design museums, and art galleries, including Graphic Design Museum (Breda, Netherlands), Gwangju Design Biennale (Korea), and The San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art.

ImagePlot software was developed as part of our Cultural Analytics research program.

Learn more about Imageplot at Software Studies.

REWIRE

Wednesday, September 28 at 9:00am - September 30 at 9:00pm
Liverpool John Moore’s University Design Academy

Duckinfield Street, Off Brownlow Hill
Liverpool, United Kingdom
The fourth International Conference on the Histories of Media Art, Science and Technology, Rewire, will be hosted by FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) and held in Liverpool, UK, from 28-30 September, 2011, In collaboration with academic partners: Liverpool John Moores University, CRUMB at the University of Sunderland, the Universities of the West of Scotland and Lancaster, and the Database of Virtual Art at the Dept. for Image Science, Danube University.

A new widespread condition of sociability invites a questioning of the role of media art practice and new media histories in the context of wider cultural and technological developments, and Rewire aspires to do just that.

MOBILE ART FEATURES #2


New Media Artist Peggy Nelson: Exploring the Parallax of Identity

Interviewed by Molly Hankwitz, Contributing editor, NewmediaFIX

Peggy Nelson is a Boston-based  new media artist, writer, and filmmaker, who has been exploring Twitter as a medium for literary interaction with audiences, and using various high- and low-tech tools to explore urban history and psychogeographic casts upon places. Nelson’s work is part of trends in art and writing to more fully engage public spaces through use of new technologies to probe and intervene in the surface layers of human memory, thought and interaction.

MH: Twitter literature, what is it and how is it collaborative?

PN: Twitter literature is published via Twitter, 140 characters at a time. Some authors are posting their already-written novels, one tweet at a time. Some are re-posting diary entries from real people, often long-dead. I am creating a narrative within Twitter as I go, and leaving it open for responses by other people who might ask the main character questions. In a sense, every Twitter account is a character, a “performance,” even if that performance is “me” or “you.” So when I create an account for a character, the character is actually telling their story, and I am not just pasting in sentences from a prewritten novel. I don’t co-write or crowdsource. I still believe in individual creation, and Twitter as a propagation medium, or platform. However, during my recent project, In Search of Adele H [https://twitter.com/adelehugo], people didn’t interact as much as they might have or I thought they would. They realized it was art, and kept a respectful distance. I was not encouraging them to step back. It just happened.

MH: You create the work through a Twitter account and individuals receive the tweets and can weave their own stories with the fiction subconsciously or even start a thread. How do they get to the work, or you to them? Through Twitter?

PN: Yes. The first piece was inspired by The Story of Adele H, by Francois Truffaut (1975). My ‘Adele H’ happened within Twitter. ‘She’ was a public account. Thus Adele H gained followers just like any other Twitter account and she followed people back. I had a supplemental blog for the project, where I explained the piece, and periodic articles in various journals, including OtherZine [http://www.othercinema.com/otherzine/index.php?issueid=22&article_id=89]. I also invited interested people by asking them to follow and participate. However, what happened was that almost no one intervened with their own replies or tried to change the narrative. Even though all these tools allow interactivity, we don’t always avail ourselves of it. We still like to kick back and “listen.” I think there is great value in being an audience for each other.

I called Adele H a Twitter “film,” following along the lines of Yoko Ono’s Instruction Pieces. The movie occurs in your mind as you read the tweets. Ono’s paintings were supposed to occur in your mind as you read the Instructions. I started with an outline for a “normal” art film that I had written about Adele Hugo, Victor Hugo’s youngest daughter, as my narrative structure. I intended to take a similar approach to Ross McElwee’s in Sherman’s March (1986), where he sets out to do a documentary about Sherman’s March and ends up telling the story of his own relationships and girlfriends. I intended to tell Adele’s real history woven through with my own relationship stories; to tell tragedy as comedy. But once I got on Twitter, it occurred to me that it would be more interesting to bring “Adele” back to life as a cyber-entity, and to have her tweet, in the present, from both her own century and ours. This would give the feminism more depth.

Her own writing was obsessive fantasies created with quill pen and diary; these fantasies became her life. Today many people journal very publically through blogs and Twitter, and while it’s not always clear exactly where reality leaves off and fantasy takes over, when it goes public, numerous differences emerge which can be very intriguing. First of all, audiences can read what is written immediately, or at least this is possible and it’s increasingly more difficult to secrete away thoughts in some attic endlessly embroidering them. Online, writers need to be self-aware. It’s substantially different from a diary. Also, readers and authors are both “in” Twitter, in the same narrative space as the characters, so there can be some wonderful overlaps. Thirdly, we are using this technology to reinvent ourselves and our characters. A parallax is provided, therefore, to what we are doing in the present, by using an older character, one from another time, to mediate.

MH: Are you working on other social media projects?

PN: I have begun a Twitter novel, Shackleton [https://twitter.com/EShackleton], about another real person, Ernest Shackleton, and his Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Shackleton’s ship was crushed in the ice, and he spent two years trying to escape; they couldn’t get a message out because they had no radio system, and radios didn’t reach that far back then anyway. There were other mishaps while trying to survive and get the men back alive. Numerous films have been made and books published on this adventure; the 1999 exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in New York rejuvenated Shackleton’s reputation and publicized the story. However, most of the books and films leave out significant events – there is too much to absorb.

Paradoxically, the micromoments of Twitter allow me to tell stories of substantial length, and to reveal all the close calls and death-defying escapes, without them all hitting at once, since you don’t have to stay with micromoments all the time. You don’t have to make a special interruption in your day, to enjoy them per se. They fit into minutes, bus rides, ordinary  activities. You get the tweets and in your mind you can start aggregating the larger story. But fragmentation is fine. You don’t have to get the whole story. You can miss some and get the rest of it later, you’re never locked into a strict chronological narrative.

Best of all, the medium is truly democratic. Anyone can make one of these Twitter projects. Twitter accounts are free. I’m influenced by graffiti, and public art of this kind; the idea of many messages all over the city; small interventions into urban spaces. Tweeted characters (like Adele H) are interventions into cyber-spaces. I use computers and communications technologies constantly, in my job as a designer. I am always thinking of how I can repurpose them for art.

MH: Do you think personal blogs perceived to be written by males are read differently, as something more like gaming, identity, news?

PN: We still have a gender differentiation in the culture about how we receive written material and male authors still tend to be taken more seriously, more quickly, even if what they’re writing is a series of extemporaneous personal reflections; while women still have to prove themselves, often over and over. Men can also be very critical of and aggressive toward each other’s writing, sure, but the fact is that there is still a gender gap in perception. We have a lot of work to do as feminists in this area.

MH: In this work on Shackleton you play a male character. Do you think audiences may choose to interact more with this narrative character?

PN: Good question. They might. Not only is Shackleton a male character, but the narrative is an action-adventure story, whereas Adele H was about unrequited love that took place in a woman’s head. I don’t know if readers will react more aggressively to such an alpha-male story, and try to post or interact with “him” more because of that, or if they will again keep a respectful distance because they see it as art. I don’t have a preference for a certain reaction, I’m fine with the distance, but if there’s more interaction, I’ll see how it goes. I’m not hiding the fact that I am a woman and I am writing Shackleton’s life, but will they see the character as male, or have an issue with a woman writing it?  I don’t know. I’m sure you have had the experience of having to identify with male characters in a story or film because that’s what was there. That feels familiar to many women. Men don’t tend to have the same problem.

MH: Talk about your outdoor public mobile projects, please.

PN: I am working on some distributed narratives in real space. The first one, The Audio Tour [http://theaudiotour.com], premiered at Burning Man in 2006. I recorded various sounds and impressions  from blogging my travels both on and off the playa. These were downloadable to any mp3 player, and I also had mp3 players to take or borrow at my camp. I was inspired by the Situationist concept of the dérive, which encouraged not conforming to main avenues and official urban spaces; finding your own version of a city or place, when coming up with the tour. I tried to do a dérive of the space of Burning Man, if you will, and then let others hear it.

The Audio Tour drew from museum audio guides, the kind where you are told to “play No. 3″ and an art historian tells you about the art — but with a twist. My audio was randomized. You play the entries at random with no “listening stations” marked as such. Thus, the listener decides what a listening station might be. You wander around with the downloads and arrive at a listening station — simply by deciding you are at one!  The recorded passages, juxtaposed with the place the listener is, tend to match up. We are pattern-making and pattern-seeking animals. Whenever we walk around, we are flowing along with our stream of consciousness. It might be about the place we are in, it might be about a conversation we need to have, it might be music, some ideas from a book, or concerns about public affairs. Our experience of a place is not only determined by the place but all that we bring to it, vertically, historically, and especially when traveling. I wanted that kind of “mash-up” to comprise the content of the tour. The basic idea is: stream of consciousness out in the world.

The second project was Web021 [http://www.web021.org/]. “021” is the beginning of the Boston zip code. Web021 was somewhat similar to The Audio Tour, but not as random. It was about real Boston history plus quotes and passages of fiction set in Boston. It used 2D barcodes (or QR codes) on stickers. You see them more often in magazines now, advertising various things, but you can make your own. I designed my own 2D barcodes on stickers and put them up all over Cambridge, MA, where I live; each one was linked to a unique URL that would give you one of these passages, from Hawthorne, or Santayana, or Samuel Adams, about Boston. It was location-specific in that the stickers were intentionally put at particular places and the text was centered around both real and fictional “Bostons.” Of course, the piece was in Boston. I was very influenced by graffiti and all the stickers we see drawn on with Sharpies. I guess it is locative art. I think of it like Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, as art in the environment, except not all in one spot; Web021 was distributed; deliberately made not to be seen all at once. Twitter is also a distributed medium, more in time than space. The audiences doesn’t need to read it all at once and the distributed fragments can add up to something much larger, deeper and more substantial.

MH: Your pieces differ on the grounds of their interactivity, and what’s interactive changes from contexts of the computer at home to an augmented reality context/QR code application. Do you feel a greater familiarity with Twitter and social media and, perhaps, continued exposure to these mobile literary art forms in your audience, will lead to their participation in your future works?  Will you design for this?

PN: That’s a good question. I have not been as concerned with interactivity being a central component of my work up to this point. I have included it as a possibility in some of my pieces, especially the Twitter work, but it’s optional, and does not “break” the piece if it doesn’t happen. What I’d really love to see is other people becoming inspired to do their own locative art, either in real space or in cyberspace, so we can have many artistic and cultural interventions like these, similar to how we have lots of graffiti by different makers. In many urban environments graffiti is the norm, not the exception. I’d love to see narrative and sonic interventions achieve a graffiti-like saturation.

MH: Thank you.

Peggy Nelson, New Media and Film – artist’s website

http://peggynelson.com/

The Open Hardware Scholarship







    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: The Open Hardware Scholarship!
    Do you have the next big Open Hardware idea, but just don?t have the funds
    for it?

    The Open Hardware Summit (OHS) is announcing its first Open Hardware
    scholarship this year! The purpose of the OHS scholarship is to support
    emerging artists/inventors and developers by providing funding for works
    that are released as Open Source Hardware. Granting these funds is an
    opportunity to draw attention to the Open Source Hardware movement, to give
    back to the DIY community, and to give you the chance to join a growing
    roster of gamechangers in Open Source Hardware history. If you have a
    project that is in the spirit of the OHS and supports the OHSW definition,
    we welcome your submissions.

    PRIZE
    Upwards of $2000 will be awarded. The scholarship is made available by the
    generous individuals and sponsors who have made the Open Hardware Summit
    possible.

    PUBLIC VOTE
    The winner will be chosen by the public. All projects will be viewable
    online and votes will be collected during the week of the summit. People
    will be able to vote on their favorite project remotely or onsite. A check
    will be presented to the winning artist/group at the conclusion of OHS on
    September 15th at the New York Hall of Science

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. upload a 30 second (maximum) video clip to youtube that showcases the
    concept of your project. The title of the video MUST be the title of the
    work

    2. include a short paragraph in the description of the video. Your
    description must start with the following sentence, and go on to explain
    your project in less than 500 characters.
    Example:
    ?The following project is a submission to the Open Hardware Scholarship
    awarded by the Open Hardware Summit 2011.
    Project title: ?
    Project Description:..?

    3. email the following information to hirumi.n@gmail.com :

    name of artist/collaborative group
    email address
    place of resident (city, state/province, country)
    title of project
    summary of project (500 characters max)
    URL of video clip
    URL of project site that includes your application of the OSHW Definition
    (optional)
    DEADLINE
    For submissions is 12:01am, September 14th EST. NO EXCEPTIONS

    NOTES:
    Please feel free to email hirumi.n@gmail.com if you have any questions.

    Where does the money come from? We had $2,000 USD left over from our funds
    last year and we thought the best way to use it is to give it back to the
    community.

    Good luck!

    Hirumi Nanayakkara
    Scholarship Chair
    Open Hardware Summit 2011

WATERWHEEL

Call for Performances/presentations

WATERWHEEL will be launched on 22 August, in Brisbane (Australia) AND will take place live online on the TAP at 6.30pm – find your time here – Media release attached.

The TAP is an online, real-time venue and forum, workshop and stage for live networked performance and presentation. Here you can create and collaborate, rehearse and remix, present and exchange, participate and communicate—privately as a crew or publicly with an audience. The Tap provides tools for live networking and real-time media mixing.

This is a call for proposals for performances/presentations (of 5 minutes each maximum) for the launch of WATERWHEEL – with a deadline for proposals of 12 August 2011. The entire performance/presentation program will be no longer than 30-45min.  Below some info on how to use WATERWHEEL. Do not hesitate in contacting us for more details or a guided tour of the TAP.

Suzon Fuks
Australia Council for the Arts Fellow
skype: suzonfuks
http://suzonfuks.nethttp://www.igneous.org.au
Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail
_________________________________________

WHAT IS WATERWHEEL
A new online platform exploring ‘water’ as a topic and metaphor. Here is a short video presentation about it – check our vimeo account for a new video coming soon showing the TAP in its latest development!  See also media release attached and info below.
All you need is a computer with internet access and a web browser with the latest version of Adobe Flash Player. To contribute and collaborate via the Tap, you might also need a webcam and headset depending on your performance/presentation.
* sign up, you will receive an email with a link
* Activate the link, you can create your TAP (please give it a title) and upload on the WHEEL (check also your junk/spam box, maybe email goes there)
For details, please download pdf document about upload requirements & how to use the TAP.


HOW TO UPLOAD
Video tutorial here.
You can upload: Image (JPG, PNG)  | Video (MP4) | Animation/Slideshow (SWF) | Audio (MP3) | Document (RTF, PDF, DOC, XLS) : all media about ‘water’ as a topic or metaphor

HOW TO USE THE TAP
* once you signed up and activated the link received by email
* you can create your TAP (please give it a title) and upload on the WHEEL (check also your junk/spam box, maybe email goes there)
* If you want to invite someone on your TAP, add that user in your crew
* user will receive an invitation by email with a link
* link has to be activated
* user will log in
* then click on ‘My Taps’ & on the table, there will be ‘superD’ TAP or another titled TAP you’ve been invited to
* On the right side of the table, you have a link ‘ENTER’. Click on it.
* the TAP will load on your webpage (patience, it might take a few minutes – you might be asked to update your flash player to new version, that doesn’t take much time. Just follow the prompt. But you might need to re-log-in)
* You can go with or without webcam. You will need to go on the top menu and select a tab (webcam, visuals, audio) and within each tab, an icon that you will drag onto the stage below. If you want to type chat, go on the write side at the bottom, there is an entry for public and crew. And in the middle on the right, there is another entry for a crew private chat (not seen by audience).
* if you click on a media (once it is dragged on the white page), you will see a palette of tools – first row from top: keep your mouse down when you select one of the tools, second row: resetting tools, third row: just a click on the tool you need, volume icon: keep your mouse down and go down to diminish the volume.

This project is initiated by Suzon Fuks as part of a Fellowship assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body; in collaboration with INKAHOOTS and IGNEOUS, supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland, Brisbane City Council, the Judith Wright Centre for Contemporary Arts, Ausdance Queensland, Youth Arts Queensland & iMAL. Creative Sparks is a joint initiative of Brisbane City Council and the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland. People collaborating so far on the project are from NZ, Australia, Indonesia, India, Serbia, Germany, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, UK, Canada & USA.

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| blog | vimeo | flickr | twitter | WATERWHEEL site

SUMMER BREAK

newmediaFIX is taking  break on regular postings  for a few weeks. Check back with us on Monday, August 11, 2011.  In the meantime make sure to peruse our Twitter Feed

The Mobile City


EVENT: Interaces and metropolises 8th encounter between French and Swiss urban planners, Lausanne, 8 July2011